Here’s your #TapeTuesday! New Order – Power, Corruption & Lies (1983)

Here's your #TapeTuesday! New Order with their 1983 release Power, Corruption & Lies allowed them a distinct makeover, eschewing the stripped down goth punk of their previous band Joy Division for a brighter, tech-savvy embrace of the new decade. Where the debut New Order album Movement came off as a nervous dirge, PC&L found singer Bernard Sumner finally comfortable in his thin, ethereal voice, nearly the audio opposite of the booming basso profundo of late Joy Division singer Ian Curtis. Bassist Peter Hook brought the human element with his rubbery basslines clashing against the army of synthesizers, drum machines, sequencers and processors, something missing from the faceless masses of synth-pop groups of the era. "Age of Consent" immediately grabbed the listener with its catchy pop rock but the first hit single from New Order came out in 1983 and was not even found on this album (it would be added to the US cassette and CD releases after its success). Originally written as a perfect encore for the band, "Blue Monday" took elements from the album track "5-6-7" creating a dance floor smash that would become one of the 1980's biggest pop hits. Sumner's deadpan vocal of "How does it feel" rode a terminally funky bassline out of the Sylvester songbook making it a pop song that the goths and punks alike could agree with. Originally released as a 12-inch single, "Blue Monday" with its Peter Saville-designed floppy disc sleeve ended up costing the band and it's label a few bucks per single sold. Not exactly a successful business plan. However, the single was rereleased and remixed (once by Quincy Jones) multiple times, finally catching the 80's zeitgeist on New Order's 1987 compilation "Substance." The album remains a chilly, vibrant crossroad between post punk and pop that the band walked remarkably. Purchased at Record Utopia December 2017 for $3. #NewOrder #BernardSumner #PeterHook #StephenMorris #GillianGilbert #Factory #TonyWilson #PeterSaville

A post shared by Andy Derer (@andyderer) on

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